How to Make Fake Water for a Diorama

If you’ve ever participated in a diorama contest, or even watched one on TV, you’ve probably wondered how they get fake water to look so realistic. Well, here’s a quick 10-minute tutorial on how to make faux water that will make your diorama look like a real science project!

The best part about making a diorama, whether it is for an educational purpose or in preparation for a model railroad display, is experimenting with fake water. Fake water has to be the trickiest thing to make, since it has to look and behave like real water that is flowing, but you can’t use any of the real stuff, like rain, as to make it behave.

I’m sure if you’ve ever plunked down the cold hard cash for one of those awesome “How to Make Your Own Diorama” books you’ve wondered if it would be possible to make fake water for a diorama that isn’t so fake looking. Well, I happen to know one man who has figured out how to do it and I’d like to share his method with all of you. It’s pretty simple really.

Knowing how to create fake water for a diorama is essential whether you’re working on a DIY project like a model train layout or a school assignment.

Sure, you could utilize real water if you wanted to, but this would severely restrict your project’s mobility. If you utilize real water, for example, you won’t be able to simply move your project from one place to another.

So, for your diorama, you’ll need to create artificial water that appears like actual water, or at the very least, is convincing enough to keep you in the scene.

So let’s get started! (no sarcasm intended) 


What You’ll Need To Make a Diorama With Fake Water

You may use a variety of materials to create the impression of water.

The most common materials are resin and glue, which are both inexpensive and readily accessible at almost any hardware shop. However, branded items that create faux water effects in dioramas, such as those from Woodland Scenics, may sometimes be superior since they’re purpose-built.

Resin: 

One of the simplest methods to create faux water effects in a diorama is to use resin. In fact, using resin results in a superior glossy appearance.

However, you must exercise caution while working with resin; to prevent unpleasant surprises, make sure your diorama is made of UV-resistant materials, since certain resins may become cloudy over time. You must also be cautious of air bubbles after pouring, like with the majority of the other items on this list. To pull them out, you may use a pin or even the heat from a blowdryer.

Pros: 

  • Time-efficient 
  • Cheap 
  • Looks crystal clear 

Cons:

  • It may be difficult to choose the appropriate resin. 
  • Materials for the diorama are limited. 

Glue: 

Glue is one of the most often used materials, particularly among the ‘amateur’ set. It’s simple to use and may be found at any ordinary shop.

Depending on your choice, you may use PVA Glue, blue Glue, or transparent Glue. You may also tint your glue with food coloring or acrylic paint before applying it to your diorama, then apply the glue to your diorama and you’re done. 

Pros:

  • Cheap 
  • Simple to use 
  • It is completed fast. 

Cons: 

  • Using low-quality glue may result in an artificial appearance that does not look good.

Products with a Realistic Water Effect:

Water effects fluids for dioramas and other models are available from a variety of manufacturers. Some of the most popular brands are Woodland Scenics Realistic Water, Vallejo Still Water, AKI Diorama Effects, and others. Because they are all custom-made and come with their unique set of instructions, be sure to follow each brand’s particular instructions.

The great thing about these brands is that they’re designed to appear and act like water, so even if they’re a bit more costly than resin, you certainly get what you pay for!

Pros: 

  • Extremely effective 
  • Helps you save time 

Cons: 

  • Border is required. 
  • Costs more than glue or resin. 

 


What Is the Process for Adding Fake Water to a Diorama? 

After you’ve chosen what kind of material you’ll use to create fake water for your diorama, you’ll need to figure out how to manufacture it! Let’s break down the procedure into steps: 

STEP 1: Getting the diorama ready

You must first prepare the diorama before adding water. So, essentially, you need to make sure that your diorama is completely finished below where you’re going to pour your fake water, because once it’s down, there’s no turning back.

Turning your diorama upside down (if feasible) will ensure that there is nothing loose that will slide about when the liquid touches it and mess up your diorama. If that’s the case, a dab of adhesive to keep it in place should do the job.

STEP 2: Make a border 

After that, you’ll need to create boundaries to prevent the water from leaking out. No matter what substance you employ, it starts out as a liquid. It should be OK if you’re simply pouring it into a hole in your diorama, but if the water will end up at the diorama’s edge, you’ll need to seal it beforehand.

You may use a sheet of plastic (cut from an old supermarket box) or even some strong masking tape for this. Make sure you put a line of hot glue around the borders to seal it, since no matter how excellent your tape job is, it WILL seep out.

STEP 3: Pour in the water. 

After you’ve finished the border, just pour the water you’ve chosen into the diorama according to the directions. Pouring should be done slowly and steadily, and in tiny portions to let it to smooth out before adding more.

It’s always simpler to add something than it is to take something away!

STEP 4: Add effects and waves 

Finally, after the water is in place, you can begin to add ripples, waves, and even tiny fish models when the water settles.

When the water is 70% set, gently blow on it with a straw to create ripples. It should be set enough that a powerful breath will move it, but not so set that it will remain in place.

Doing a series of quick, little blows in the same direction along the length of a river and then striking it with a dry brush of white acrylic can give realism to your model that was before lacking!


Before you add water to the diorama, how do you prepare it?

Setting up your diorama is the first and most important step in adding water. The diorama floor and the model’s perimeter should be free of cracks. To construct an edge around the diorama, you may use stock cards, cardboard, or plastic sheeting.

If there are still any gaps in the model, you must use glue to fill up the cracks or holes before continuing since the liquid will eventually seep down and out the bottom of your model.

If you’re not cautious, it may destroy the whole diorama. You may also use a thin layer of plaster, thick mod podge, or even hot glue to cover any area that will be exposed to water. 

Finally, before you add any liquid to the model, you’ll need to finish painting all of the other elements of your diorama. Using a dark brown in the center of the water and gradually lightening as it approaches the banks, as well as gluing in some sand or pebbles along the coastline, looks fantastic.

Finally, depending on the liquid you’re using and the kind of material you’ve used, you may need to apply a sealant to keep it from becoming soggy.


 How to Add Ripples, Waves, or Splashes and How to Make Them 

Many individuals struggle to create the effect of water in their dioramas. It’s because they don’t have all of the required supplies, which may be difficult. 

Many things may be used to alter the appearance of your water so that it resembles ocean waves or lake ripples. For this, gloss gels and glazes are frequently utilized. They may be found at any arts and crafts shop that sells acrylic paints. 

Gels and glazes, like the rest of your diorama’s paints, are applied using paintbrushes.

These paints, on the other hand, create a three-dimensional shape that is constant across any building.

For these media, Liquitex is the preferred brand since it holds up well and dries uniformly.

Alternatively, you may create a texture in the top of your resin/brand name water by blowing on it with a straw after it’s approximately 70% hardened, as described above.


Recommendations: 

If you’re just getting started and are having trouble figuring out how to utilize all of the materials to get the greatest results, here are some pointers: 

  • If you’re just going to utilize glue, use several layers to make the design seem more genuine. 
  • Multi-layer water sceneries, such as waterfalls, rapids, and streams, may enhance the overall beauty of the diorama.
  • To make the water borders more alive, use stones and grass models.
  •  

Whatever the reason, adding water effects to your diorama will make it more stunning. Don’t be scared to try something new with your project!

Do you have a unique technique or a great suggestion that we’ve overlooked? Please let us know in the comments section below!

Model-Railway-Layout-Planner-and-Database

For as long as he can remember, Peter has been constructing model trains. This site is a creative avenue for him to go further into various sizes and elements of the model train community and hobby. He is an ardent lover of HO and O scale.

Have you ever wanted to make a diorama but didn’t have the time to make the water? Fear not! Making fake water is simple! Here are two easy methods to make fake water for your dioramas!. Read more about how to make fake water with hot glue and let us know what you think.

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1. Get a clear container. 2. Put some water in it. 3. Put a few drops of green food coloring.

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Q: Can you get a bachel”}},{“@type”:”Question”,”name”:”How do you make fake water with glue?”,”acceptedAnswer”:{“@type”:”Answer”,”text”:”
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Frequently Asked Questions

How do you make fake water?

1. Get a clear container. 2. Put some water in it. 3. Put a few drops of green food coloring. Q: How to call a function that returns a pointer to an array? You cannot call a function that returns a pointer to an array. The *

Can I use clear glue for fake water?

Yes, clear glue is a good alternative to fake water. However, it does not look as good as the actual fake water that you buy. This is because the natural material for fake water actually has a transparency to it, but clear glue does not. Q: Can you get a bachel

How do you make fake water with glue?

You can make fake water by mixing a 50/50 ratio of water and Elmers white glue and adding a drop of blue food coloring. Q: Can you make a robot with a paper towel tube? Yes, you can make a robot with a paper towel tube. The

Related Tags

This article broadly covered the following related topics:

  • how to make sea water diorama
  • how to make realistic water
  • how to make fake water with glue
  • how to make fake water with elmer’s glue
  • how to make fake water with clear glue

About Vaibhav Sharda

Vaibhav Sharda

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